Monday, May 31, 2010

Hooray For Earth

Hooray For Earth

Momo

Dovecote

As if we needed any further evidence of the synth’s ascendency to its proper place on the throne of contemporary indie, this six-song EP from the Boston-New York four-piece Hooray for Earth further smudges the meaningless lines between rock and electronic. Gritty distortion and the filtering of the beautiful through a wall of fuzz has always been the primary attack in the perpetually burgeoning band’s diverse arsenal, but this bundle of washed-out synth euphoria largely writes Hooray for Earth’s bygone guitar shredding out of the picture. Instead the bright noise comes in heavily affected group vocal harmonies and cresting waves of keyboard rapture. Opener “Surrounded by Your Friends’’ crystalizes the ethos at work here; it’s like a 1960s folk band tripping through space and time. If it hasn’t already been licensed for a half dozen commercial spots yet, don’t be surprised to hear it in some hip car company’s pitch, like tomorrow. “Comfortable, Comparable’’ works the climactic 1980s teen film montage uplift that bands like Yeasayer have popularized of late, while “Get Home’’ deals a grimmer, dark-wave austerity. The band, which has just embarked on a high-profile national tour, has been threatening to break out for years. This should do the trick. (Out tomorrow)

ESSENTIAL “Surrounded by Your Friends’’

Boston Globe

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